Is the comedy film suitable for children?


It’s almost the weekend, which means many parents and families will be looking for a fun new movie to watch together. This Friday, June 24, Netflix releases the comedy action film by Woody Harrelson and Kevin Hart The man from Toronto.

Since Hart is known for his adult comedy and Harrelson has starred in many R-rated movies, it’s understandable that parents would want to check out the content and maturity of this goofy comedy.

Fortunately, parents are lucky, because The man from Toronto is fairly tame compared to some of Hart and Harrelson’s earlier works and it’s only rated PG-13. Below, we’ve provided more details regarding the movie’s rating and the reasoning behind it so parents can feel more confident about what they might watch for young viewers.

The Toronto Man Parents Guide & Age Rating

The man from Toronto is rated PG-13. According to official MPAA movie rating sitePG-13 movies may contain content inappropriate for children under 13. Parents are asked to be careful.

In the case of this action-adventure film starring Kevin Hart and Woody Harrelson, the PG-13 rating is due to violence throughout, strong language, and suggestive material. After seeing the movie, I can say that the rating is mostly about the violence, as there are guns, fights, and intense action sequences throughout the movie.

If you and your family have watched other Kevin Hart PG-13 movies together, such as Along, Central intelligence, evening schoolor even the live-action Jumanji movies, then The man from Toronto should be fine for you and your young children, as there’s nothing too gratuitous about the movie.

There’s also no sexual content in this film, although as mentioned above there are some suggestive jokes related to Teddy (Hart) and his wife, Lori (Jasmine Mathews), but it is very soft.

The man from Toronto releases this Friday, June 24, only on Netflix.

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